528 ABA Journal Legal Rebels articles.

Tech is not the only answer to legal aid issues, justice center director Joyce Raby says (podcast)
Since the late 1990s, Joyce Raby has spent a career bringing technology to legal aid. While a booster and believer in technology's potential to improve America's legal system, her experience is tempering.

"We've been saying for a very long time that technology was going to be the saving grace for the justice ecosystem," she says. "I don't think it is."
From paper to digital documents, Judge Andrew Peck traveled (and set) the discovery trail (podcast)
For litigators accustomed to conducting discovery inside large warehouses surrounded by hundreds, if not thousands, of cardboard file boxes, combing through several forests' worth of paper to find the few relevant documents was like trying to find the needle in the haystack.
Legal tech has a diversity problem, new report says
New research confirms what many had suspected: women and minority founders are underrepresented in legal technology.
Mark Britton talks about leaving Avvo and what’s next
In 2005, Mark Britton sat at a kitchen table in Sardinia, Italy.

It had been about two years since he left the online travel company Expedia, where he was an executive, and he was ready to uncork something new. It wasn’t a bottle of cabernet sauvignon or grenache that the Mediterranean island is known for: He was aerating an idea that could change how legal services were delivered in the United States.
Outgoing Adobe GC Mike Dillon saw changes that digitization and globalization wrought (podcast)
Mike Dillon has seen a lot change over his career as general counsel to some of the nation’s largest technology companies.
Longtime legal tech leader Richard Granat finds a new challenge (podcast)
Before Microsoft launched Windows and AOL filled American mailboxes with floppy disks, Richard Granat was building software to improve legal services.
Mary Juetten hopes legal software can help improve access-to-justice problems (podcast)
What will be a big legal trend for 2018? Mary E. Juetten is putting her hopes on legal technology improving access-to-justice problems.
Robert Litt has been out front on online threats for decades (podcast)
Robert Litt has confronted cybersecurity and encryption issues for two presidential administrations. With Russian interference in the 2016 election as a backdrop, Litt, an ABA Journal Legal Rebels Trailblazer, says the U.S. has been facing online threats essentially since the internet's creation.
Catch up with the ABA Journal’s 2017 Legal Rebels Trailblazers
In each of the last 12 months, the ABA Journal has checked in with a group of legal professionals who have pioneered the use of technology for problem-solving, research and innovation, among other traits. Read about them and listen to our interviews with them.
Tech coach Adriana Linares translates tech for lawyers (podcast)
Adriana Linares considers it a badge of honor to work in the legal profession without being a lawyer.
Robert Ambrogi’s blog points lawyers to tech’s opportunities (podcast)
Robert Ambrogi likes to say he took a nontraditional path to becoming a legal journalist. Namely, he went to law school.
Successful law firms provide both proper environment and tech tools
The noble legal profession is notorious for its inability to move away from long-standing traditions. While many firms of all sizes experiment with new technologies, methodologies and business practices, the vast legal landscape can hardly be distinguished from itself two or more decades ago.
Bruce MacEwen diagnoses and prescribes for law practice ills (podcast)

Bruce MacEwen is both a doctor and an epidemiologist in the world of BigLaw firms.

A ‘principled’ artificial intelligence could improve justice
“To what extent should societies delegate to machines decisions that affect people?” This question permeates all discussions on the sweeping ascent of artificial intelligence. Sometimes, the answer seems self-evident.
Charles Kenji Whitehead: Teaching startup law as startup products start up
From the late 1980s to mid-2000s, Cornell Law School professor Charles Kenji “Chuck” Whitehead was steeped in BigLaw securities and deals work. He also had top leadership positions as a hybrid banker and a lawyer in big finance companies involved in venture capital and securities.

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