Legal Rebels

522 ABA Journal articles on Legal Rebels.

Mary Juetten hopes legal software can help improve access-to-justice problems (podcast)
What will be a big legal trend for 2018? Mary E. Juetten is putting her hopes on legal technology improving access-to-justice problems.
Robert Litt has been out front on online threats for decades (podcast)
Robert Litt has confronted cybersecurity and encryption issues for two presidential administrations. With Russian interference in the 2016 election as a backdrop, Litt, an ABA Journal Legal Rebels Trailblazer, says the U.S. has been facing online threats essentially since the internet's creation.
Catch up with the ABA Journal’s 2017 Legal Rebels Trailblazers
In each of the last 12 months, the ABA Journal has checked in with a group of legal professionals who have pioneered the use of technology for problem-solving, research and innovation, among other traits. Read about them and listen to our interviews with them.
Tech coach Adriana Linares translates tech for lawyers (podcast)
Adriana Linares considers it a badge of honor to work in the legal profession without being a lawyer.
Robert Ambrogi’s blog points lawyers to tech’s opportunities (podcast)
Robert Ambrogi likes to say he took a nontraditional path to becoming a legal journalist. Namely, he went to law school.
Successful law firms provide both proper environment and tech tools
The noble legal profession is notorious for its inability to move away from long-standing traditions. While many firms of all sizes experiment with new technologies, methodologies and business practices, the vast legal landscape can hardly be distinguished from itself two or more decades ago.
Bruce MacEwen diagnoses and prescribes for law practice ills (podcast)

Bruce MacEwen is both a doctor and an epidemiologist in the world of BigLaw firms.

A ‘principled’ artificial intelligence could improve justice
“To what extent should societies delegate to machines decisions that affect people?” This question permeates all discussions on the sweeping ascent of artificial intelligence. Sometimes, the answer seems self-evident.
Charles Kenji Whitehead: Teaching startup law as startup products start up
From the late 1980s to mid-2000s, Cornell Law School professor Charles Kenji “Chuck” Whitehead was steeped in BigLaw securities and deals work. He also had top leadership positions as a hybrid banker and a lawyer in big finance companies involved in venture capital and securities.
Lainey Feingold: Negotiating better access for the disabled
The word compliance is frequently used in legal matters related to the Americans with Disabilities Act. But Lainey Feingold says simply meeting the law’s standard is not enough.
Ryan Alshak: Keeping time so you don’t have to
Ryan Alshak and some friends developed a great app for electronic devices to exchange digital profiles rather than business-card information over Bluetooth connections. But no one was going to beat down any doors to get it.
Joshua Browder: His ‘chat’ is not just talk
For Joshua Browder, necessity really is the mother of invention. The 20-year-old London native is a self-described terrible driver who took action on his ton of traffic tickets while driving to and from high school.

“I’d get huge tickets, and I wouldn’t be able to pay them because I didn’t have a job,” Browder says. “I had to figure out a way to solve my problems legally."
DoNotPay chatbot adds feature allowing users to sue Equifax over data breach
Joshua Browder

Joshua Browder. Photo by Tony Avelar.

Joshua Browder has unleashed his legal chatbot, DoNotPay, for those…

John Tredennick of Catalyst took the lead in the ‘80s to bring tech to his law firm (podcast)
John Tredennick started a focus on legal technology in 1988—back when law firms saw it as something limited to fancy computers and adding machines. He asked Holland & Hart, the Denver-based firm where he was a partner, to add the words chief information officer to his title. Inspiration came from an American Bar Association conference.
Matthew Stubenberg: Creating tech solutions to increase justice
Matthew Stubenberg’s legal career is shaped by the Great Recession. In 2010, he started law school at the University of Maryland, where he “fell in love with criminal defense.” However, upon graduation in 2013, the legal market was still recovering, and he was without a job. That was when Stubenberg learned how to code.

Read more ...




Digital Dangers logo with thumbprint lock.
Cybersecurity and the law
A guide for practitioners ...

Defending Justice shield logo.
Essays on judicial independence
A new online series ...


Your Voice

Articles and commentary ...


Podcasts

More podcasts ...


Careers