ABA Journal Podcast

227 ABA Journal articles on ABA Journal Podcast.

From paper to digital documents, Judge Andrew Peck traveled (and set) the discovery trail (podcast)
For litigators accustomed to conducting discovery inside large warehouses surrounded by hundreds, if not thousands, of cardboard file boxes, combing through several forests' worth of paper to find the few relevant documents was like trying to find the needle in the haystack.
How can we fight to reduce bias? 6th Circuit judge shares her thoughts (podcast)
Studies have shown that implicit bias is something that affects everyone to some degree. So what steps can legal professionals at all ranks take to make the justice system fairer and more equitable?

In this episode of the Modern Law Library, the ABA Journal’s Lee Rawles speaks with Judge Bernice Donald of the Cincinnati-based 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and professor Sarah E. Redfield of the University of New Hampshire School of Law about Enhancing Justice: Reducing Bias, a book published by the ABA.
Where are the jobs for the Class of 2018? (podcast)
Newly minted law grads will soon be entering the job market, but where are they most likely to find employment? In this episode of Asked and Answered, the ABA Journal's Stephanie Francis Ward speaks with Valerie Fontaine, founding partner of the legal search firm SeltzerFontaine, about which in-demand areas of law have open job positions—and how law grads can secure them.

How broken windows policing changed the legal landscape in ‘Misdemeanorland’ (podcast)

As violent crime in New York City peaked from 1988-1991, policy makers were desperate for ways to combat and prevent it. In 1994, a new theory was embraced by the…

Roe v. Wade had broader impact than the public realizes, says author of ‘Beyond Abortion’ (podcast)
In the 45 years since Roe v. Wade was decided, it has been a focal point for both anti-abortion and pro-abortion rights groups. But the opinion in the 1973 case has also been used by activists of liberal, libertarian and conservative ideologies to develop privacy arguments for issues ranging from access to experimental drugs to euthanasia to personal data security to sex worker rights.
Outgoing Adobe GC Mike Dillon saw changes that digitization and globalization wrought (podcast)
Mike Dillon has seen a lot change over his career as general counsel to some of the nation’s largest technology companies.
How firms can encourage mental, emotional and physical fitness (podcast)
Wellness is not just about eating health food and exercising, Jolene Park tells the ABA Journal's Stephanie Francis Ward in this episode of Asked and Answered. It’s also about getting enough time to relax, getting enough sleep and not being stressed out about your job or finances — and employers can play a big role in all of those things.
Uncovering the secret history of how corporations gained their civil rights (podcast)
When we think of civil rights movements, the first to spring to mind might be the battles against African-American segregation or for women's suffrage. But one of the longest, most successful–and least-known–of these movements in America has been made on behalf of corporations. In this episode of the Modern Law Library, professor Adam Winkler, author of We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights, shares what he learned from his investigation into how corporations have achieved constitutional protections ranging from the right to sue and be sued, to individual rights like religious liberty protections and free speech.
Longtime legal tech leader Richard Granat finds a new challenge (podcast)
Before Microsoft launched Windows and AOL filled American mailboxes with floppy disks, Richard Granat was building software to improve legal services.
Dark tale of ‘The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist’ brings false convictions to light (podcast)
For nearly two decades, Dr. Steven Hayne and Dr. Michael West were the go-to experts who Mississippi law enforcement and prosecutors relied on when there was a potential homicide. Hayne performed the bulk of the autopsies in the state, while West was a dentist who touted his skill in bite-mark analysis and his pioneering use of UV light on human skin to detect trace markings he claimed he could match to objects. But after years of investigations and countless testimonies from the men, their claims of expertise began to fall apart—and wrongful convictions began coming to light.
How to turn tech savvy into a fulfilling legal career (podcast)
You love technology, you love the law, and you want a career that combines the two. But what kinds of legal tech jobs will be the most in demand, and how can you get them?
A stalled elevator leads to love in lawyer’s best-selling debut novel (podcast)
Wedding Date book cover
Being trapped on an elevator leads to romance for the hero and heroine in The Wedding Date, written by attorney Jasmine Guillory. When a pediatric surgeon impulsively asks the mayor's chief of staff to be his date to his ex-girlfriend's wedding that weekend, sparks fly. But can the two make a long-distance relationship work?
Mary Juetten hopes legal software can help improve access-to-justice problems (podcast)
What will be a big legal trend for 2018? Mary E. Juetten is putting her hopes on legal technology improving access-to-justice problems.
Teamsters lawyer pens children’s book to show importance of the labor movement (podcast)
As general counsel for the Teamsters Union Local 810, Mark Torres spends his days arguing for workers' rights. But another of his passions is writing; he published his debut crime novel A Stirring in the North Fork in 2015.

So when he was approached by Hard Ball Press to write a bilingual children's book explaining the importance of labor unions in ways that kids could connect with, Torres agreed. Good Guy Jake (or Buen Chico Jake) tells the story of a sanitation worker who breaks the rules by taking toys from the trash along his route, but for a good reason: He fixes the toys and donates them to a local shelter so that children can have presents at Christmas. When Jake's manager discovers that Jake has been violating regulations, it's up to Jake's union representative, his lawyer and an arbitration judge to determine whether Jake has to lose his job or whether there's a more fitting solution to the problem.
Loving life as a lawyer: How to maintain joy in your work (podcast)
Do you dread going to work? If so, maybe it's time to look at the other ways you can flex your legal skills, Nancy Levit says. There are many types of jobs for lawyers, and sometimes what you thought you wanted to do doesn’t work out, Levit tells the ABA Journal's Stephanie Francis Ward in this episode of Asked and Answered.

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