Podcasts

Legal Rebels Podcast

John Tredennick of Catalyst took the lead in the ‘80s to bring tech to his law firm (podcast)

John Tredennick started a focus on legal technology in 1988—back when law firms saw it as something limited to fancy computers and adding machines. He asked Holland & Hart, the Denver-based firm where he was a partner, to add the words chief information officer to his title. Inspiration came from an American Bar Association conference.

Read more ...


The Modern Law Library

How the author of ‘The Forgotten Flight’ fought for justice for terror victims’ families (podcast)

If you mention a terrorist attack in which a Libyan suitcase bomb brought down an airliner, most people will be quick to remember Pan Am Flight 103, which crashed on Dec. 21, 1988 in Lockerbie, Scotland, killing 270 people. But there is another, similar attack that happened nine months later, on Sept. 19, 1989.

Asked and Answered

How can lawyers help Hurricane Harvey victims? Disaster response attorneys share tips (podcast)

The full scale of the damage from Hurricane Harvey may not be known for weeks or months. But even as the rain is still falling, lawyers in Texas and across the country are mobilizing to meet the legal needs of the people who have been impacted.

Asked and Answered

Seeking equal pay? Here are some strategies (podcast)

Studies have shown that salary and compensation at firms can still be markedly higher for white males than attorneys with a different ethnicity or gender. But if you feel you aren't being paid commensurate with your colleagues and with the value you bring to your firm, how should you proceed?

Asked and Answered

Is diversity all talk? (podcast)

Diversity at law firms, especially at the higher levels of partnership, continues to be a hot topic of discussion. But is that all that it is, a discussion item?

Legal Rebels Podcast

From C-suite to legal service founder, Michael Mills has always been a leader (podcast)

It's common now for large law firms to have a chief knowledge officer to determine how technology can help lawyers do their jobs more effectively. When Michael Mills first took on that type of role for Davis Polk & Wardwell in 1990, hardly any others were around to imitate. The internet barely even existed.

The Modern Law Library

First Amendment defender Floyd Abrams warns of threats to free speech in ‘fake news’ era (podcast)

The rights to free speech and freedom of the press were guaranteed in the Bill of Rights. But when it was first passed—and for its first hundred or so years—the First Amendment was not the robust defense we think of today.

Legendary civil rights attorney Floyd Abrams joins the ABA Journal’s Lee Rawles to discuss his book The Soul of the First Amendment in this episode of the Modern Law Library.

Asked and Answered

Sneak peek into ABA Annual Meeting in NYC (podcast)

Have you considered attending the 2017 ABA Annual Meeting in New York City this August?

Asked and Answered

How the radical movements of the 1960s changed the law and challenged the status quo (podcast)

In this episode of Asked and Answered, the ABA Journal’s Victor Li speaks with attorney and activist Paul Harris about his work stretching back to the 1960s. Harris, one of the radical “movement lawyers” featured in the cover story for the August issue of the ABA Journal, talks about his work defending high-profile clients like Huey Newton, Leonard McNeil and others.

The Modern Law Library

Merriam-Webster editor shares the ‘Secret Life of Dictionaries’ (podcast)

What do lawyers and lexicographers have in common? The main job of both is to determine the meaning of words.

In this episode of the Modern Law Library, the ABA Journal's Lee Rawles talks with Kory Stamper about her work as a lexicographer and editor for Merriam-Webster; her new book, Word by Word: The Secret Life of Dictionaries; and her position as chief defender of the word "irregardless."

Legal Rebels Podcast

Richard Susskind sees ‘rosy future’ for law—if it embraces technology (podcast)

For more than three decades, Richard Susskind has been one of the profession's most prolific voices in support of implementing technology with legal services delivery. He's the author of more than 10 books on the topic, and his next one will focus on technology in the courtroom.

The Modern Law Library

Meet this year’s finalists for the Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction (podcast)

In this special mega-episode of the Modern Law Library, the ABA Journal's Lee Rawles speaks with all three finalists for this year's Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction about their novels, careers—and the first time they remember reading To Kill a Mockingbird.

Asked and Answered

How to be your own advocate at work without stepping on toes (podcast with transcript)

The Modern Law Library

How government actions, not personal choices, created segregated neighborhoods (podcast)

Richard Rothstein spent years studying why schools remained de facto segregated after Brown v. Board of Education. He came to believe that the problem of segregated schools could not be solved until the problem of segregated neighborhoods was addressed—and that neighborhoods were de jure segregated, not de facto.

Legal Rebels Podcast

Paul Lippe’s ‘new normal’ was always about innovation (podcast)

For years, Paul Lippe has been a leader in helping corporate law departments adopt the approaches used in the best and most innovative parts of their own companies—and in doing so, significantly changing the relationships with and the work done by their outside lawyers.

The Modern Law Library

David Grann uncovers conspiracy behind 1920s murders of members of oil-rich Osage Nation (podcast)

Although the Osage Nation had been forced from their ancestral lands by the U.S. government, through shrewd and careful bargaining, they retained the mineral rights to one of the richest oil fields in the world: Osage County, Oklahoma.

But the wealth of the Osage Nation, instead of insuring the prosperity and safety of the tribe, made its members targets for what was later known as the Reign of Terror. The task of solving dozens of murders fell in the 1920s to the newly formed FBI and its young director, J. Edgar Hoover.

Asked and Answered

How to land government contracts as a minority- or women-owned firm (podcast with transcript)

Government entities at all levels often set aside a portion of work for minority and women-owned businesses, including law firms. But many people are unsure about how to land these contracts or receive certification.

The Modern Law Library

How a Chinese-American family challenged school segregation in 1920s Mississippi (podcast)

Legal Rebels Podcast

Lisa Solomon found the time was right for her career in online legal research (podcast)

The Modern Law Library

Should bystanders have a legal duty to intervene? Holocaust scholar weighs in (podcast)

If you are a bystander and witness a crime, should intervention be a legal obligation? Or is moral responsibility enough?

Asked and Answered

Are schools that fail to teach children to read violating their rights? (podcast w/transcript)

The 14th Amendment has been used to secure civil rights for a multitude of groups. But does it give children a constitutional right to literacy? Is it the government's responsibility to adequately fund schools, so students learn what they need to reach appropriate reading levels?

Read more ...