Podcasts

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The Modern Law Library

Scottoline, Tobisman and Turow discuss their 2018 Harper Lee Prize-nominated novels (podcast)

Lisa Scottoline, C.E. Tobisman and Scott Turow have at least three things in common: They’re all novelists, attorneys and nominees for this year’s Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction. In this special episode of the Modern Law Library, the ABA Journal’s Lee Rawles speaks with all three authors about their nominated books, their creative processes, and the role they believe lawyers play in society.

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Legal Rebels Podcast

Tech is not the only answer to legal aid issues, justice center director Joyce Raby says (podcast)

Since the late 1990s, Joyce Raby has spent a career bringing technology to legal aid. While a booster and believer in technology's potential to improve America's legal system, her experience is tempering.

"We've been saying for a very long time that technology was going to be the saving grace for the justice ecosystem," she says. "I don't think it is."

Asked and Answered

Attending the ABA Annual Meeting? Here’s a sneak peek (podcast)

This August, lawyers from around the country will come to Chicago for the ABA Annual Meeting. Wondering whether to make the trip yourself?

In this special bonus episode of Asked and Answered, we’re joined by ABA President Hilarie Bass and Marty Balogh of the ABA meetings and travel department.

The Modern Law Library

How Anthony Comstock’s anti-obscenity crusade changed American law (podcast)

From 1873 until his death in 1915, Anthony Comstock was the most powerful shaper of American censorship and obscenity laws. Although he was neither an attorney nor an elected official, Comstock used an appointed position as a special agent of the U.S. Post Office Department and legislation known as the Comstock Laws to order the arrests and prosecutions of hundreds of artists, publishers, doctors and anyone else he felt was promoting vice.

Podcasts have become a way for ABA entities to educate and entertain

Asked & Answered

Quest for Perfection: Brian Cuban talks about lawyers and body image (podcast)

Lawyers' mental health has been a topic of increasing discussion and awareness, combined with efforts to help lawyers deal with anxiety, depression and addiction issues. But an aspect of mental health that is sometimes overlooked is body image, and the consequences of body dysmorphia and eating disorders.

The Modern Law Library

How Nixon used a law firm stint to resurrect his political career and win the presidency (podcast)

After losing both the 1960 presidential election and the 1962 California governor’s race, Richard Milhous Nixon vowed at a press conference: “You won’t have Nixon to kick around anymore” and seemed to have written the epitaph to his political career. He left for New York and became a partner in a white shoe law firm. Yet six years later, he would win the White House, in no small part because of that firm.

Legal Rebels Podcast

From paper to digital documents, Judge Andrew Peck traveled (and set) the discovery trail (podcast)

For litigators accustomed to conducting discovery inside large warehouses surrounded by hundreds, if not thousands, of cardboard file boxes, combing through several forests' worth of paper to find the few relevant documents was like trying to find the needle in the haystack.

The Modern Law Library

How can we fight to reduce bias? 6th Circuit judge shares her thoughts (podcast)

Studies have shown that implicit bias is something that affects everyone to some degree. So what steps can legal professionals at all ranks take to make the justice system fairer and more equitable?

In this episode of the Modern Law Library, the ABA Journal’s Lee Rawles speaks with Judge Bernice Donald of the Cincinnati-based 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and professor Sarah E. Redfield of the University of New Hampshire School of Law about Enhancing Justice: Reducing Bias, a book published by the ABA.

Asked and Answered

Where are the jobs for the Class of 2018? (podcast)

Newly minted law grads will soon be entering the job market, but where are they most likely to find employment? In this episode of Asked and Answered, the ABA Journal's Stephanie Francis Ward speaks with Valerie Fontaine, founding partner of the legal search firm SeltzerFontaine, about which in-demand areas of law have open job positions—and how law grads can secure them.

The Modern Law Library

How broken windows policing changed the legal landscape in ‘Misdemeanorland’ (podcast)

The Modern Law Library

Roe v. Wade had broader impact than the public realizes, says author of ‘Beyond Abortion’ (podcast)

In the 45 years since Roe v. Wade was decided, it has been a focal point for both anti-abortion and pro-abortion rights groups. But the opinion in the 1973 case has also been used by activists of liberal, libertarian and conservative ideologies to develop privacy arguments for issues ranging from access to experimental drugs to euthanasia to personal data security to sex worker rights.

Legal Rebels Podcast

Outgoing Adobe GC Mike Dillon saw changes that digitization and globalization wrought (podcast)

Mike Dillon has seen a lot change over his career as general counsel to some of the nation’s largest technology companies.

Asked and Answered

How firms can encourage mental, emotional and physical fitness (podcast)

Wellness is not just about eating health food and exercising, Jolene Park tells the ABA Journal's Stephanie Francis Ward in this episode of Asked and Answered. It’s also about getting enough time to relax, getting enough sleep and not being stressed out about your job or finances — and employers can play a big role in all of those things.

The Modern Law Library

Uncovering the secret history of how corporations gained their civil rights (podcast)

When we think of civil rights movements, the first to spring to mind might be the battles against African-American segregation or for women's suffrage. But one of the longest, most successful–and least-known–of these movements in America has been made on behalf of corporations. In this episode of the Modern Law Library, professor Adam Winkler, author of We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights, shares what he learned from his investigation into how corporations have achieved constitutional protections ranging from the right to sue and be sued, to individual rights like religious liberty protections and free speech.

Legal Rebels Podcast

Longtime legal tech leader Richard Granat finds a new challenge (podcast)

Before Microsoft launched Windows and AOL filled American mailboxes with floppy disks, Richard Granat was building software to improve legal services.

The Modern Law Library

Dark tale of ‘The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist’ brings false convictions to light (podcast)

For nearly two decades, Dr. Steven Hayne and Dr. Michael West were the go-to experts who Mississippi law enforcement and prosecutors relied on when there was a potential homicide. Hayne performed the bulk of the autopsies in the state, while West was a dentist who touted his skill in bite-mark analysis and his pioneering use of UV light on human skin to detect trace markings he claimed he could match to objects. But after years of investigations and countless testimonies from the men, their claims of expertise began to fall apart—and wrongful convictions began coming to light.

Asked and Answered

How to turn tech savvy into a fulfilling legal career (podcast)

You love technology, you love the law, and you want a career that combines the two. But what kinds of legal tech jobs will be the most in demand, and how can you get them?

The Modern Law Library

A stalled elevator leads to love in lawyer’s best-selling debut novel (podcast)

Wedding Date book cover
Being trapped on an elevator leads to romance for the hero and heroine in The Wedding Date, written by attorney Jasmine Guillory. When a pediatric surgeon impulsively asks the mayor's chief of staff to be his date to his ex-girlfriend's wedding that weekend, sparks fly. But can the two make a long-distance relationship work?

Legal Rebels Podcast

Mary Juetten hopes legal software can help improve access-to-justice problems (podcast)

What will be a big legal trend for 2018? Mary E. Juetten is putting her hopes on legal technology improving access-to-justice problems.

The Modern Law Library

Teamsters lawyer pens children’s book to show importance of the labor movement (podcast)

As general counsel for the Teamsters Union Local 810, Mark Torres spends his days arguing for workers' rights. But another of his passions is writing; he published his debut crime novel A Stirring in the North Fork in 2015.

So when he was approached by Hard Ball Press to write a bilingual children's book explaining the importance of labor unions in ways that kids could connect with, Torres agreed. Good Guy Jake (or Buen Chico Jake) tells the story of a sanitation worker who breaks the rules by taking toys from the trash along his route, but for a good reason: He fixes the toys and donates them to a local shelter so that children can have presents at Christmas. When Jake's manager discovers that Jake has been violating regulations, it's up to Jake's union representative, his lawyer and an arbitration judge to determine whether Jake has to lose his job or whether there's a more fitting solution to the problem.

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