Podcasts

Beyond Abortion book cover
The Modern Law Library

Roe v. Wade had broader impact than the public realizes, says author of ‘Beyond Abortion’ (podcast)

In the 45 years since Roe v. Wade was decided, it has been a focal point for both anti-abortion and pro-abortion rights groups. But the opinion in the 1973 case has also been used by activists of liberal, libertarian and conservative ideologies to develop privacy arguments for issues ranging from access to experimental drugs to euthanasia to personal data security to sex worker rights.

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Legal Rebels Podcast

Outgoing Adobe GC Mike Dillon saw changes that digitization and globalization wrought (podcast)

Mike Dillon has seen a lot change over his career as general counsel to some of the nation’s largest technology companies.

Asked and Answered

How firms can encourage mental, emotional and physical fitness (podcast)

Wellness is not just about eating health food and exercising, Jolene Park tells the ABA Journal's Stephanie Francis Ward in this episode of Asked and Answered. It’s also about getting enough time to relax, getting enough sleep and not being stressed out about your job or finances — and employers can play a big role in all of those things.

The Modern Law Library

Uncovering the secret history of how corporations gained their civil rights (podcast)

When we think of civil rights movements, the first to spring to mind might be the battles against African-American segregation or for women's suffrage. But one of the longest, most successful–and least-known–of these movements in America has been made on behalf of corporations. In this episode of the Modern Law Library, professor Adam Winkler, author of We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights, shares what he learned from his investigation into how corporations have achieved constitutional protections ranging from the right to sue and be sued, to individual rights like religious liberty protections and free speech.

Legal Rebels Podcast

Longtime legal tech leader Richard Granat finds a new challenge (podcast)

Before Microsoft launched Windows and AOL filled American mailboxes with floppy disks, Richard Granat was building software to improve legal services.

The Modern Law Library

Dark tale of ‘The Cadaver King and the Country Dentist’ brings false convictions to light (podcast)

For nearly two decades, Dr. Steven Hayne and Dr. Michael West were the go-to experts who Mississippi law enforcement and prosecutors relied on when there was a potential homicide. Hayne performed the bulk of the autopsies in the state, while West was a dentist who touted his skill in bite-mark analysis and his pioneering use of UV light on human skin to detect trace markings he claimed he could match to objects. But after years of investigations and countless testimonies from the men, their claims of expertise began to fall apart—and wrongful convictions began coming to light.

Asked and Answered

How to turn tech savvy into a fulfilling legal career (podcast)

You love technology, you love the law, and you want a career that combines the two. But what kinds of legal tech jobs will be the most in demand, and how can you get them?

The Modern Law Library

A stalled elevator leads to love in lawyer’s best-selling debut novel (podcast)

Wedding Date book cover
Being trapped on an elevator leads to romance for the hero and heroine in The Wedding Date, written by attorney Jasmine Guillory. When a pediatric surgeon impulsively asks the mayor's chief of staff to be his date to his ex-girlfriend's wedding that weekend, sparks fly. But can the two make a long-distance relationship work?

Legal Rebels Podcast

Mary Juetten hopes legal software can help improve access-to-justice problems (podcast)

What will be a big legal trend for 2018? Mary E. Juetten is putting her hopes on legal technology improving access-to-justice problems.

The Modern Law Library

Teamsters lawyer pens children’s book to show importance of the labor movement (podcast)

As general counsel for the Teamsters Union Local 810, Mark Torres spends his days arguing for workers' rights. But another of his passions is writing; he published his debut crime novel A Stirring in the North Fork in 2015.

So when he was approached by Hard Ball Press to write a bilingual children's book explaining the importance of labor unions in ways that kids could connect with, Torres agreed. Good Guy Jake (or Buen Chico Jake) tells the story of a sanitation worker who breaks the rules by taking toys from the trash along his route, but for a good reason: He fixes the toys and donates them to a local shelter so that children can have presents at Christmas. When Jake's manager discovers that Jake has been violating regulations, it's up to Jake's union representative, his lawyer and an arbitration judge to determine whether Jake has to lose his job or whether there's a more fitting solution to the problem.

Asked and Answered

Loving life as a lawyer: How to maintain joy in your work (podcast)

Do you dread going to work? If so, maybe it's time to look at the other ways you can flex your legal skills, Nancy Levit says. There are many types of jobs for lawyers, and sometimes what you thought you wanted to do doesn’t work out, Levit tells the ABA Journal's Stephanie Francis Ward in this episode of Asked and Answered.

Modern Law Library

Bryan Garner reflects on his friendship with Justice Antonin Scalia in ‘Nino and Me’ (podcast)

To Bryan Garner, editor-in-chief of Black’s Law Dictionary, Justice Antonin Scalia was a friend, a mentor, a collaborator and a fellow lover of words. In the wake of Scalia’s death on Feb. 13, 2016, Garner reflected back over their relationship, from their first brief introduction in 1988 to the trip they took to Asia together in the last weeks of Scalia’s life. Those reflections turned into his latest book, Nino and Me: My Unusual Friendship with Justice Antonin Scalia.

Legal Rebels Podcast

Robert Litt has been out front on online threats for decades (podcast)

Robert Litt has confronted cybersecurity and encryption issues for two presidential administrations. With Russian interference in the 2016 election as a backdrop, Litt, an ABA Journal Legal Rebels Trailblazer, says the U.S. has been facing online threats essentially since the internet's creation.

Asked and Answered

Need a helping hand? Here’s what a lawyers assistance program can do for you

Confronting someone about a substance abuse problem—or owning that you have one—is not easy, but lawyers assistance programs can help.

The Modern Law Library

How a Quaker’s suit against the defense secretary in the 1970s still affects surveillance cases

You have reason to believe you’re being monitored by the government—that they are following you and cataloging everywhere you go and everyone you talk to. The knowledge haunts you, and it has a chilling effect on everything you do. But can you sue to stop it, or even to find out whether it's really happening?

Legal Rebels Podcast

Catch up with the ABA Journal’s 2017 Legal Rebels Trailblazers

In each of the last 12 months, the ABA Journal has checked in with a group of legal professionals who have pioneered the use of technology for problem-solving, research and innovation, among other traits. Read about them and listen to our interviews with them.

The Modern Law Library

Barbie v. Bratz: What happened when toy titans took each other to court (podcast)

In this month’s Modern Law Library, we read a thrilling tale of dueling toymakers, corporate espionage and a group of brats taking on the queen of the Dreamhouse.

Professor Orly Lobel, author of You Don’t Own Me: How Mattel v. MGA Entertainment Exposed Barbie’s Dark Side, speaks to the ABA Journal’s Lee Rawles about how an intellectual property dispute between the maker of Barbie and the creator of Bratz spun into a legal battle that would last more than a decade.

Legal Rebels Podcast

Tech coach Adriana Linares translates tech for lawyers (podcast)

Adriana Linares considers it a badge of honor to work in the legal profession without being a lawyer.

The Modern Law Library

Georgetown law prof calls for reimagining of criminal justice system in ‘Chokehold’ (podcast)

As a former federal prosecutor in Washington, D.C., Paul Butler once worked to put people in prison. Now, he has come to believe that prisons should be abolished.

Asked and Answered

Esquire Etiquette: Minding your manners at work (podcast)

True etiquette is not about stuffy rules—it's about behaving in a way that makes people feel comfortable. But as social norms change, and some people have a hard time separating personal from professional behavior. Before your firm's holiday party, it may be time to check in on what is—and is not—appropriate.

The Modern Law Library

Will big-data tools make policing less biased—or violate people’s rights? (podcast)

One day, there is a knock at the door, and you are handed a letter. The letter lists your friends, your activities, and the possible legal consequences you might face for those activities. The letter also says that you may be the next to be shot—or to kill someone else.

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